quiet in the interests of a quiet taoist

through the title of ‘interests of a quiet taoist’ there’s an acknowledgement of an approach to learning or view that is gentle in commitment, although not necessarily in content.  this can be seen and observed for example in concerns regarding interpretation of behavioral based safety toward violence and nursing intervention (not necessarily counter to behavior safety but towards others in authority whom don’t recognise its weaknesses or have difficulty in acknowledging conveyance from those considered ordinary – at the coal face of experience). even in such a view the taoist view is essential is so much as an attempt towards harmonious dialogue, the importance of environment, setting, conditions and visual as matters of intervention, prevention and complimentary reasoning.

e.e cummings is definitely an influence in conveying a quiet approach whereby sentences aren’t commenced or hammered in with capitals and use of parenthesis is done so not because it has to be there but can contribute to useful dialogue. most items are written to a maximum of three sentences within up to three paragraphs so as not to overwhelm or waffle. the nobody approach towards the tao is an apt evolution in understanding messages of tao rather than owning particular person-hood or identity (which isn’t really important in ego terms) that become too distracting.

the tao offers a way whereby many subjects can be approached very differently and in such a way that can offer a real plural alternative to the norm and ideally promotes a peaceful understanding of the natural – simple but not necessarily simplistic. meaning, meaningful and meaningless all have their place with the tao and whilst in one context can produce very little understanding with the right space can possess an almost magical quality. it can at times be hard to grasp but should neither be entirely grasped – such is its constant and paradoxical nature.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.